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The 1999–2013 United States Cancer Statistics (USCS): Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report includes the official federal statistics on cancer incidence from registries that have high-quality data, and cancer mortality statistics. It is produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This report shows that in 2013, 1,536,119 Americans received a new diagnosis of invasive cancer, and 584,872 Americans died of this disease (these counts do not include in situ cancers or the more than 1 million cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancers diagnosed each year).

This year’s report features information on invasive cancer cases diagnosed during 2013, the most recent year of incidence data available, among residents of 49 states, six metropolitan areas, and the District of Columbia—geographic areas in which about 99% of the U.S. population resides. Incidence data are from CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Data from population-based central cancer registries in these states and metropolitan areas meet the criteria for inclusion in this report.

The report also provides cancer mortality data collected and processed by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. Mortality statistics, based on records of deaths that occurred during 2013, are available for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The report also includes incidence rates and counts for Puerto Rico for 2009 through 2013 by sex and age, as well brain tumor and childhood cancer data.

USCS data are presented in the following applications—

 

Cancer statistics for Hispanics/Latinos, 2012 by Rebecca Siegel MPH, Deepa Naishadham MA, MS, Ahmedin Jemal DVM, PhD

Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012

Abstract

Hispanics/Latinos are the largest and fastest growing major demographic group in the United States, accounting for 16.3% (50.5 million/310 million) of the US population in 2010. In this article, the American Cancer Society updates a previous report on cancer statistics for Hispanics using incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2012, an estimated 112,800 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed and 33,200 cancer deaths will occur among Hispanics. In 2009, the most recent year for which actual data are available, cancer surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics. Among US Hispanics during the past 10 years of available data (2000-2009), cancer incidence rates declined by 1.7% per year among men and 0.3% per year among women, while cancer death rates declined by 2.3% per year in men and 1.4% per year in women. Hispanics have lower incidence and death rates than non-Hispanic whites for all cancers combined and for the 4 most common cancers (breast, prostate, lung and bronchus, and colorectum). However, Hispanics have higher incidence and mortality rates for cancers of the stomach, liver, uterine cervix, and gallbladder, reflecting greater exposure to cancer-causing infectious agents, lower rates of screening for cervical cancer, differences in lifestyle and dietary patterns, and possibly genetic factors. Strategies for reducing cancer risk among Hispanics include increasing utilization of screening and available vaccines, as well as implementing effective interventions to reduce obesity, alcohol consumption, and tobacco use. CA Cancer J Clin 2012;. © 2012 American Cancer Society.

 This research study was conducted on 8 dates of an annual flu shot clinic at the San Francisco General Hospital. Patients were offered flu shots as usual (control group) and on 9 other dates, patients were offered both flu shots and FOBT kits (intervention group). Researchers wanted to determine whether providing home fecal occult blood test (FOBT) kits to eligible patients during influenza inoculation (flu shot) clinics can contribute to higher colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) rates. The study concluded that offering FOBT kits during flu shot clinics dramatically increased the CRCS rate for flu shot clinic attendees. Pairing home FOBT kits with annual flu shots may be a useful strategy to improve CRCS rates in other primary care or public health settings.

This monograph looks at the incidence of cancer in mobile populations as well as significant issues in cancer screening, treatment and prevention for this population.