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Steps For an Organization to Consider When Addressing Conflict

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How to De-escalate a Tense Interaction

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Anger amidst care resource

Haitian CreoleLeer en espanol button  

Images of the featured resources

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A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

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How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

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Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

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Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

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Healthy Sleep Tips

Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

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Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

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English brochure preview

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2021 Heat Related illness Clinicians Guide

Agricultural workers are at significant risk for heat stress. Heat stress results when the body cannot get rid of excess heat and its core temperature rises.  Heat stress may lead to more severe heat illness including heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat stroke, and even death if left untreated.  Agricultural work, which requires performing physically demanding work for long hours in hot and sometimes humid weather, places workers at high risk.

This guide provides information to clinicians on the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness. Since workers may not be familiar with all of the symptoms of heat stress, it is important that clinicians discuss heat illness symptoms and prevention with agricultural workers and others who are at risk.

 


This joint FJ and MCN publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of awards totaling $1,949,598 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HHS.gov.

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Title page of comic book

Diabetes is a common but complicated health condition facing agricultural workers within the United States. To help assist agricultural workers in learning about this diagnosis, Migrant Clinicians Network has partnered with professional artist and collaborator Salvador Sáenz to create “Mi salud es mi tesoro: Un guía para vivir bien con diabetes,” or, “My Health is My Treasure: A Guide to Living Well with Diabetes.” This low-literacy comic book explores the topic through the full-color story of an agricultural farmworker named Goyo, whose recent diagnosis of diabetes prompts him to engage in conversations with other agricultural workers on topics of diet, exercise, and illness prevention while facing the unique hurdles of living a life of migration. The comic book was originally produced in Spanish, and is now available in English below. Please click "Leer en español" above to access the Spanish-language version. 

 

Download a digital copy of the comic book below!

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: December 13, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES and Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at the​ir​ worksite ready for the day's work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. ​​It didn't take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting.​ Soon his world was spinning​ and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and resulted in at least 13 worker deaths between 2000 and 2011. ​

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

This resource offers training for community based organizations and workers in the aftermath of natural disasters. It includes educational materials as well as trainer guides and tools.

Blog post from the U.S. Department of Labor highlighting common hazards during hurricane cleanup as well as links to additional readings.

Information on keeping food and water safe for consumption and best hygiene practices in the face of disasters.

Offers tips about potential hazards and protective strategies during disaster cleanup.

"Coccidioidomycosis or Valley Fever is an infectious disease in parts of the U.S.A. It is caused by inhaling microscopic arthroconidia (also known as arthrospores or spores) of the closely related fungal species Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. Areas where Coccidioides is endemic (native and common) include states in the southwestern U.S.A. such as Arizona, California, New Mexico, Nevada, Texas, and Utah and parts of Mexico, Central America and South America."

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: May 24, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


MCN webinar what to do when diabetes affects your mood

DATE: May 10, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Patria Alguila and Ileana Ponce-Gonzalez, MD, MPH, CNC

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​In this webinar participants will be able to identify the Health Resource Services Administration performance measures related to depression, describe symptoms of depression, understand how to encourage patients to control and manage their diabetes and depression​, and understand the principle barriers faced by patients in the control and management of their diabetes and depression

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the term mental illness
  2. List at least two symptoms of depression
  3. Define the HRSA quality measure for depression screening
  4. Understand at least one barrier in the control of diabetes and depression

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

"Emerging Infectious Diseases is an open access journal published monthly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)." ... "Emerging Infectious Diseases follows the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommendations for the conduct, reporting, editing, and publishing of scholarly work in medical journals. The journal’s peer review process allows for critical assessment of submitted manuscripts by experts who are usually not part of its editorial staff. As an independent publication, the journal’s peer-review process operates independently from CDC’s clearance processes."

Tomato Workers Health Guide

 

Available in English and Spanish!

 

Created by MCN, medical student Rachel Kelley of UCSF, and collaborators at East Tennessee State University, this guide is intended to be a reference for health care providers who work with people employed in the U.S. tomato industry. It aims to prepare providers with a more detailed understanding of hazards, health issues, and work processes associated with different tomato industry jobs.

This guide draws on published research, experienced health professionals’ advice, and information gathered from interviews and focus groups conducted with 36 tomato workers from diverse backgrounds and 14 community leaders familiar with tomato workers’ health in multiple states. It is important to note that health and safety conditions at any particular farm or company may vary from what is described here. Furthermore, individual workers may experience the same set of conditions differently.

The first section of the guide focuses on health hazards and health conditions commonly encountered in tomato production. The second section consists of detailed descriptions and illustrations of different tomato production tasks. The third section covers “human resources” information and policies that apply to U.S. agricultural workers generally. The appendices contain a Spanish-English glossary, further detail about different types of pesticides, information about agricultural occupational health policies and regulation, and a list of resources and readings.

A kit from the CDC designed to help reduce the risk of infection by the Zika virus. "If you live in a state or area with the mosquito that spreads the Zika virus and are concerned about Zika, build your own Zika Prevention Kit (...). Reducing the risk for Zika is particularly important for pregnant women."

Information from the CDC on the Zika Virus and pregnant women.

Zika educatinal materials from the Texas Department of State Health Services which includes fact sheets, push cards, posters, and TV PSAs. Available in both English and Spanish.

A flier created by the CDC's National Diabetes Education Program as a guide for patients in the management of medicines to treat diabetes. Available in English.

 

Substance Use Warmline
Peer-to-Peer Consultation and Decision Support
10 am – 6 pm EST Monday - Friday
855-300-3595

Free and confidential consultation for clinicians from the Clinician Consultation Center at San Francisco General Hospital focusing on substance use in primary care

 

Objectives of the Substance Use Warmline:

  • Support primary care providers in managing complex patients with addiction, chronic pain, and behavioral health issues
  • Improve the safety of medication regimens to decrease the risk of overdose
  • Enhance the treatment, care and support for people living with or at risk for HIV
  • Discuss useful strategies for clinicians in managing their patients living with substance use, addiction and chronic pain.

Consultation topics include:

  • Assessment and treatment of opioid, alcohol, and other substance use disorders
  • Approaches to suspected misuse, abuse, or diversion of prescribed opioids
  • Methods to simplify opioid-based pain regimens to reduce risk of misuse and toxicity
  • Urine toxicology testing- when to use it and what it means
  • Use of buprenorphine and the role of methadone maintenance
  • Withdrawal management for opioids, alcohol, and other CNS depressants
  • Harm reduction strategies and overdose prevention
  • Managing substance use in special populations (pregnancy, HIV, hepatitis)
  • Productive ways of discussing (known or suspected) addiction with patients.

The CCC’s multi-disciplinary team of expert physicians, clinical pharmacists and nurses provides consultation to help clinicians manage complex patient needs, medication safety, and a rapidly evolving regulatory environment.

Learn more at http://nccc.ucsf.edu/clinician-consultation/substance-use-management

This 90-minute webinar was created for physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who treat and case manage patients with active TB.  The webinar introduced the 2016 Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.  This training highlighted the guidelines development process, the key changes in recommendations, and discussed the evidence supporting the changes.  The webinar was originally presented on November 4, 2016. This training was jointly sponsored by all 5 RTMCCs.

Diabetes HealthSense provides easy access to resources to help you live well and meet your goals—whether you have diabetes or are at risk for the disease. Available in English.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

  • Recorded Webinar
  • Participant Evaluation
  • Presentation Slides (PDF)

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading
  • Coming soon

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: August 17, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Amy Liebman, MPA, MA and Wilson Augustave, member of MCN’s Board of Directors and Senior HIV Case Manager at Finger Lakes Community Health

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Milton “Tito” Rafael Barreto Hernandez was 22 years old when he died. He was killed when he was pulled into a machine at the concrete crushing facility where he worked.  This work-related death could have been prevented and would likely never have happened had the right safety procedures been followed.  Low-wage workers like Tito often work in dangerous jobs and immigrants are more likely to die or get hurt at work.  In spite of dangers on the job, all workers have the right to a safe and healthy workplace. This training for community health workers will equip you with the knowledge you need to empower people to advocate for their rights on the job. Additionally, participants will come to understand how to seek help in case of a dangerous work environment and to be familiar with resources to assist workers.   

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
    Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
    Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
    Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
  2. Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
  3. Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

A CDC resource page where there is current Zika updates and resources.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Ver en Español

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 15, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Dra. Maura Patricia García Castillo, MD, MPH

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CNE or CHW (for Texas) credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

This webinar will provide an in-depth look at social determinants of health, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the interactions between the two.  Social determinants, including economic stability, access to education, access to healthy natural environments, and socioeconomic conditions like high levels of poverty in the community, are associated with early-onset cardiovascular disease. The webinar will also address the most common cardiovascular conditions among underserved populations.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the social determinants of health
  2. Recognize cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors
  3. Understand how the social determinants of health influence cardiovascular disease risk factors
  4. Learn strategies for prevention and intervention to limit the impact of these social determinants
Further Reading

Ver en Español

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: May 25, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Antonio Tovar, PhD

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

The National LGBT Health Education Center provides educational programs, resources, and consultation to health care organizations with the goal of optimizing quality, cost-effective health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

Video interview with COPE Executive Director Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD.

About COPE: The University of Washington’s COPE for Chronic Pain CME Program offers evidence-based clinical knowledge and training on how best to treat patients experiencing chronic pain. COPE CME helps clinicians assess patients and monitor their progress, mitigate risk, and focus on restoring function and quality of life. It provides guidance on when and how to start, stop, or modify opioid therapies. COPE’s online course includes case-based video vignettes that model interactions between providers and patients, helping to improve communications that promote trust. Live and web-based CME is available.

 

Only 25% of physicians feel very confident in managing patients on opioids. 

When many of today's physicians were in medical school, they learned that opioids were safe, and no dose seemed too high. Now, evidence-based practice paints a far more nuanced picture. More than 200 million prescriptions a year have contributed to widespread problems:

  • 33% of young adults say that prescription opioids are "easy to get," with many taking their friends' or parents' pills.
  • Nearly 20% of U.S. veterans with PTSD are receiving higher-dose or multiple opioids, or early refills.
  • Increased prescribing to women of childbearing age has contributed to a 4-fold increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome

COPE offers free CME on safe opioid prescribing:

  • COPE-REMS: an online, self-paced tutorial that awards up to 4 CME credits
  • UW TelePain: Providers can call in to UW Medicine and present their most difficult chronic pain cases to a multidisciplinary panel of pain medicine experts for discussion and advice. Tune in to live, lunchtime, 1-hour sessions most Wednesdays at 12 PM to earn up to 1.5 CME credits per session.

Other resources from COPE include:

These bilingual posters educate workers on how to work safely with machinery on the farm.  Developed by two Occupational Health Interns (OHIP) during their internship with the National Farm Medicine Center, these posters accompany the Seguridad en las Lecherías curriculum.

DATE RECORDED: Friday, July 11
PRESENTED BY: Ed Zuroweste, MD. Chief Medical Officer, Migrant Clinicians Network

Webinar banner
View Recorded Webinar   Participant Evaluation

EOH icon

 

MCN’s Environmental and Occupational Health Programs

Learn more about MCN’s training and technical assistance programs to help clinicians and health centers improve the recognition and management of pesticide exposures and other environmental/occupational health conditions.

Migrant workers are often employed in some of the most dangerous jobs in the United States. Lack of training, poor safety precautions, regulatory exclusions, lack of health insurance, language barriers, piece-rate pay, undocumented worker status, and geographical and cultural isolation can put these workers at increased risk for occupationally related injuries and illnesses and chronic sequelae.  

This webinar will discuss health risks facing migrants as a result of their working conditions and highlight best practices and resources to incorporate environmental and work-related health into the primary care setting.  It will aslo showcase successful initiatives employed in Community and Migrant Health Centers.  Participants will become familiar with the importance of and feasible approaches to integrate environmental and occupational health into primary care from both a clinical and social justice perspective.

 

SPONSORED BY: Migrant Clinicians Network

OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the reasons for integratin environmental and occupational health into primary care
  2. Recognize the role of the clinician in work-related exposure
  3. Be familiar with tools and resources to address occupational injuries and exposures in primary care

 


CLINICAL TOOLS & RESOURCES



PATIENT EDUCATION MATERIALS



ARCHIVED WEBINARS & TRAINING RESOURCES


MCN's Bilingual Picture Dictionary, "Seguridad en Palabras/ Safety in Words," illustrates work place hazards and best practices for health and safety in agriculture.  Developed with support from the OSHA Susan Harwood Grant Program, this resource will bolster Hispanic workers' English vocabulary and will help prevent agricultural injuries. 

DATE RECORDED: Wednesday, June 17, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Matthew Keifer, MD, MPH, Dean Emanuel Endowed Chair/Director National Farm Medicine Center

Webinar: Pesticide poisonings. Are you prepared?
View Recorded WebinarParticipant Evaluation

EOH iconMCN’s Environmental and Occupational Health Programs

Learn more about MCN’s training and technical assistance programs to help clinicians and health centers improve the recognition and management of pesticide exposures and other environmental/occupational health conditions.

 

Mistakes can be dangerous. Accurate identification of pesticides responsible for a patient's illness is important to avoid iatrogenic errors with respect to acute treatment.  Join us for an important webinar that will focus on key decision points in the diagnosis of pesticide exposures and emphasize the usefulness of the newly revised resource for clinicians - The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed.  Through interactive case studies, this webinar will illustrate effective recognition and treatment of patients over exposed to pesticides. 


The webinar, sponsored by Migrant Clinicians Network, the National Farm Medicine Center and AgriSafe Network features Dr. Keifer, a board certified occupational medicine specialist and internationally renowned researcher regarding pesticides and agricultural health and safety. For over 30 years, Dr. Keifer has focused his clinical practice and research largely on farmworkers. 

SPONSORED BY: AgriSafe Network, Migrant Clinicians Network, and the National Farm Medicine Center

OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to:

  1. Better recognize the signs and symptoms of pesticide overexposure
  2. Identify key decision points in diagnosing pesticide exposures
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to use The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed. in a clinical setting

We encourage all participants to order The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed. prior to attending this webinar. Order here. PDF versions are also available at http://www2.epa.gov/pesticide-worker-safety/recognition-and-management-pesticide-poisonings
If you have experienced any trouble ordering your copy please contact: kbrennan@migrantclinician.org 

 

 


CLINICAL TOOLS & RESOURCES



PATIENT EDUCATION MATERIALS



ARCHIVED WEBINARS & TRAINING RESOURCES



LOCAL PESTICIDE RESOURCES


The following will provide information regarding the pesticides used in your areas:

Part 5 of the 6 webinar series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

DATE RECORDED: June 5, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Katherine Brieger, RD and Elizabeth Magenheimer

View Recorded Webinar

Participant Evaluation  

Presentation Slides (PDF)

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing any of these webinars you must do the following:
  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with each webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

Diabetes continues to be one of the most common and challenging health condition confronting migrants and other underserved populations. It is clear that a healthy lifestyle is critical to mitigating the impact of diabetes on individuals and the population, however effective and appropriate interventions can be difficult to design. Fairhaven Community Health Center in Connecticut and Hudson River Healthcare in New York, are two health centers that have long led the way in creating culturally appropriate lifestyle programs for migrants and other underserved patients. In this session the presenters will discuss lessons learned from the development of a variety of programs for diabetics and other patients including a community garden, nutrition classes, cooking classes, weight management and strategies to encourage exercise. The session will address the clinical core measures related to nutrition and BMI and will also discuss current research test second line drug effectiveness in Type 2 DM. Available in English

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe culturally appropriate diabetes intervention strategies
  2. Identify strategies to address clinical core competencies related to nutrition and BMI to improve quality care.
  3. Receive “take home” examples of how to incorporate effective nutrition, weight loss, exercise and other health lifestyle strategies.

 

FURTHER READING

Download the Spanish Toolkit Materials

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/preventionprogram

Bright Bodies, http://brightbodies.org

Part 4 of the 6 webinar series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

DATE RECORDED: May 14, 2014
PRESENTED BY:  Candace Kugel, FNP, CNM and Megan Danielson, CNM

View Recorded Webinar 

 Participant Evaluation  

 Presentation Slides (PDF)

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing any of these webinars you must do the following:
  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with each webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

Migrant women face significant disparities with an additional layer of complexity and require different intervention strategies. Among them are reproductive health, pregnancy and childbirth, sexual and intimate partner violence, and cancers that disproportionately affect women, including cervical and breast cancer. Women often face environmental and occupational health exposures both in the home and in the workplace that heighten health risks. This session will provide a follow-up to the July 2013 presentation “Women’s Health at the Intersection of Poverty and Migration” that was part of our Clinician Orientation to Migration Health webinar series.  During this presentation Candace Kugel, FNP, CNM, and Meagan Danielson, CNM will discuss quality improvement and health care services for migrant women. The HRSA clinical performance measures related to women’s health will be reviewed as well as resources and best practices for improving the health of migrant women.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe strategies to address clinical core measures that relate to women’s health .
  2. Discuss case studies that assist participants in understanding how creative collaborations and models of care can improve health outcomes for migrant women.
  3. Participants will be able to access clinical resources for working with female migrant patients.

 

FURTHER READING

Low Birth Weight Resources

Cervical Cancer Resources

Other Resources

Part 6 of the 7 webinar series: Clinician Orientation to Migration Health

DATE: presented live on July 17th, 2013

PRESENTED BY: Candace Kugel, FNP, CNM, Specialist in Clinical Systems & Women's Health and Melissa Bailey, Executive Director of North Carolina Field, Inc.

 Women's Health at the Intersection of Poverty & Migration
View Recorded WebinarParticipant EvaluationPresentation Slides

  

Additional Resources:

MCN Women's Health page

MCN Health Network

Any prenatal patient who may move out of your area before giving birth is eligible to be enrolled in the Health Network. MCN will provide care coordination throughout the course of her pregnancy, until her postpartum visit is completed, to help ensure that there are no gaps in her health care.  512-327-2017 or 800-825-8205.

 

MCN Environmental Health/Pesticides Resources
MCN Family Violence Resources
MCN Streamline articles
Other Women’s Health Resources for Migrant/Immigrant Care
  • Text4Baby:  A free service that provides health education by text to pregnant women and new mothers in English and Spanish
  • The Perinatal/HIV Hotline: The National Perinatal HIV Consultation and Referral Service (Perinatal Hotline) provides 24-hour advice from HIV experts on indications and interpretations of HIV testing in pregnancy as well as consultation on treating HIV-infected pregnant women and their infants. The Perinatal Hotline (888-448-8765) is available 24 hours, seven days per week.
  • Centering Pregnancy: A model of group prenatal care widely used in a variety of settings, including FQHCs and with immigrant populations.  Materials are available in Spanish.
  • Rural Women’s Health Project  Pregnancy fotonovelas in English and Spanish.
  • Auger Communications “Teach with Stories” Prenatal Care fotonovela series and “Pregnancy and Diabetes: Lucia’s Story”
  • Wake Forest University One-page pesticides and pregnancy handout in English and Spanish. 
  • Migrant Health Promotion Farmworker Doula Manual
  • National Women’s Health Information Center. This website and toll-free call center were created to provide free, reliable health information for women everywhere, including lots of materials in Spanish.
  • March of Dimes  An array of materials at various literacy levels and almost everything in Spanish. Pamphlets, videos, "Comenzando Bien" curriculum.
  • Centers for Disease Control The CDC's Spanish website for women's health includes handouts in Spanish that can be printed from the website
  • National Perinatal Association Published transcultural perinatal education curriculum.
  • California Diabetes and Pregnancy Program.  Catalog of patient education materials in English and Spanish for perinatal issues related to diabetes and gestational diabetes.
  • “Diabetes gestacional: Guía para la mujer embarazada”.  Spanish language guide on gestational diabetes from AHRQ.
  • Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs: “The Fields: The Hidden Faces of Farmworker Women” Interviews and stories about the issues that matter most to farmworker women’s health and well-being
  • Human Rights Watch:  “Cultivating Fear: The Vulnerability of Immigrant Farmworkers in the US to Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment”
  • Legal Momentum Immigrant Women Program legal rights for immigrant women
  • Trafficking information

 

 

Historically, the field of women's health consisted of issues surrounding reproduction and childbirth. However, increasingly, the health care community has come to see women as a distinct patient group that has unique health concerns over a lifetime. Migrant farmworker women experience unique risks during pregnancy and otherwise, due to the physical demands, environmental exposures and other circumstances of their lives.  The provision of healthcare services to migrant women presents distinctive challenges for both clinicians and organizations.  MCN’s Candace Kugel, CRNP, CNM, and Melissa Bailey, Executive Director of NC FIELD, Inc., both with many years of experience with this population will discuss the problems, solutions and rewards of working with migrant women, through case illustrations and review of resources.

After taking this webinar:

  • Participants will be able to identify at least 2 health risks unique to women farmworkers and the impact of those challenges on work, nutrition and health.
  • Participants will be able to describe environmental and occupational health exposures relevant to farmworker women of reproductive age.
  • Case studies will assist participants in understanding how creative collaborations and models of care can improve health outcomes for migrant women.
  • Participants will be able to access clinical resources for working with female migrant patients.

PRESENTER BIOS:

Candace Kugel, FNP, CNM, Specialist in Clinical Systems & Women's Health, Migrant Clinicians Network

ckugel@migrantclinician.org

Candace Kugel is a Family Nurse Practitioner and Certified Nurse-Midwife with over twenty years of experience in health care for the underserved. She has worked in various clinical settings, including family planning, migrant health, community health center, and private practice. She has worked almost exclusively in rural settings.

Candace has also been active in aspects of health care other than direct patient services. She has served as a clinical instructor for nurse practitioner, nurse-midwife, nursing, and medical students, and currently has faculty appointments with the University of Cincinnati and Penn State University’s Schools of Nursing. She has worked in program development in various arenas, including co-founding a “Stork’s Store” prenatal incentive program, initiating a natural family planning education program, and teaching childbirth education classes.

Melissa Bailey, Executive Director of North Carolina Field, Inc.

 mbailey@lenoir.k12.nc.us

Melissa Bailey is a native of southern West Virginia. She has worked in North Carolina migrant education programs since 2001. In 2010 AFOP’s Children in the Fields Campaign assisted community workers with forming the nonprofit NC FIELD. This effort aimed to establish an organizational empowerment and advocacy model to build capacity in farmworker communities, particularly among child laborers in agriculture. In 2012 Melissa became the Executive Director of NC FIELD. 

She has presented to local, state, and national stakeholders; assisted media; has worked as a research assistant on farmworker studies; assisted with organizational development and the leadership training of child farmworkers, and is a successful field organizer, consultant, and project manager. Melissa holds a certificate in Nonprofit Management from Duke University, among other certifications related to the delivery of supplemental education services and data.

In her spare time Melissa enjoys reading, writing, gardening, and spending time with loved ones.

New bilingual resource available April 2014!

Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) has been using theater as an educational tool with farmworkers for over twenty years. By drawing on techniques of popular theater, SAF performs culturally appropriate, lively skits and facilitates theater workshops at farm labor camps. These performances spur conversations about mental and physical health, living and working conditions, and farmworker movements for social justice.

Many of SAF’s performances have focused on health issues, and they aim for this guide to offer dynamic tools for health care providers, educators, outreach workers, and public health innovators. Practitioners can also use these techniques with other populations across the social justice spectrum. For both organizers and educators, SAF hopes that popular theater can bolster the messages and information that you so readily share and provide a dynamic approach to outreach. Resources include songs, scripts, theater games and icebreakers. Printed copies are free, but SAF accepts small contributions to cover shipping and handling ($5-10/copy).

 

Available in print and online

Contact: Laxmi Haynes , 919-660-3660

These files are part of the Engaging Migrant Men project.

MCN developed 3 vignettes that portray the three messages developed in video and printed form.

These files are part of the Engaging Migrant Men project.

Accompanying discussion guides were created to be used by male peers, community leaders, or outreach workers for one-on-one and small group discussions with men.

Part 1 of the 6 webinar series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

DATE RECORDED: March 19, 2014
PRESENTED BY:  Deliana Garcia, MA, International Research and Development, Migrant Clinicians Network

View Recorded Webinar  

 Participant Evaluation  

 Presentation Slides (PDF)

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing any of these webinars you must do the following:
  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with each webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

**Note: Due to technical difficulities the first 7 minutes of the presentation are not recorded. Please refer to the pdf of the slides for the content that was covered in those 7 minutes.

Over the last 30 years, considerable attention has been paid in the clinical setting to cultural competency- the ability to mitigate against the effects of the sociocultural differences between clinicians and patients and to take into account how culture affects the symptoms presented or the patients’ attitude about health care.  More recently, scholars and clinicians have encouraged those in practice or health professions training to focus not only on the behaviors and beliefs of cultural groups but more importantly to consider the structural determinants, prejudices, injustices and blind spots, the “pathologies of social systems” that affect health outcomes and the stigma experienced by patients. The session will introduce participants to the broad framework of structural competency and the five core structural competencies.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the structures that shape clinical interactions;
  2. Discuss the means of developing an extra-clinical language of structure;
  3. Rearticulate “cultural” formulations in structural terms;
  4. Explain the process of observing and imagining structural interventions; and
  5. Describe the concept of structural humility.

 

FURTHER READING

Farmer, Paul, Bruce Nizeye, Sara Stulac, Salmaan Keshavjee. 2006. Structural Violence and Clinical Medicine. PLoS Medicine 2006 (3): 1686-1691.

Holmes, Seth, Fresh Fruit Broken Bodies, 2013

Messac, Luke, Dan Ciccarone, Jeffrey Draine, Philippe Bourgois. 2013. The good-enough science-and-politics of anthropological collaboration with evidence-based clinical research: Four ethnographic case studies. Social Science & Medicine 99 (2013): 176-186

Quesada, James, Laurie Kain Hart, & Philippe Bourgois. 2011. Structural Vulnerability and Health: Latino Migrant Laborers in the United States. Medical Anthropology, Vol. 30, No. 4: 339- 362

Srivastava, Ranjana. Complicated Lives—Taking the Social History. New England Journal of Medicine 2011 (365): 587-589.

Willen, Sarah. 2012. How is Health-Related “Deservingness” Reckoned? Perspectives from Unauthorized Im/migrants in Tel Aviv. Social Science & Medicine 74 (2012): 812-821.

Hombres Unidos is a peer-led workshop focused on the primary prevention of sexual and intimate partner violence (s/ipv) with Latino migrant men.  Developed in 2005 with the support from the Centers for Disease and Control, this five session workshop is implemented using a popular education technique (Paulo Freire) which is a concept that incorporates notions of class, political struggle and social transformation.  

This webinar (sponsored by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs) focuses on the collaborative development of a primary prevention workshop for Latino migrant men, the evaluation of the workshop, and the continuing effort on engaging Latino migrant men as allies with women in s/ipv prevention after the five session workshop.

After this webinar, participants will be able to identify:

  • methods on how to begin a conversation on sexual and intimate partner violence with Latino migrant men
  • process and outcome evaluation techniques on a primary prevention workshop developed for a specific population
  • efforts to continue to engage Latino migrant men in sexual and intimate partner violence prevention
  • how to incorporate existing efforts with your population

Recording & Materials

During the webinar, Adrian referenced a few handouts that are used in the program.  Below you will find a few of these in Spanish.

Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals.  The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Ostetricicans and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic envrionmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

 

A bilingual, full-color comic book about workers' compensation and workers' rights for immigrant dairy workers. It tells the story of a Mexican dairy worker injured on the job and the steps he and his employer take to ensure he receives benefits and the farm improves safety. These include stories that are applicable across the U.S. and those that are state specific.

 


The resources listed below are available from the National Immigration Law Center’s website, www.nilc.org. Each of them is subject to being updated or otherwise revised as new developments warrant. The documents available from the links provided here may be downloaded by individual readers and either printed out or viewed electronically, but electronic copies of the documents MAY NOT BE UPLOADED TO ANY WEBSITE other than NILC’s.

These resources from the Health Insurance Marketplace can be used to help direct clients to information about the Affordable Care Act.

This resource summarizes key points to bring up with your patients who have questions about ACA.

This resource from the Health Insurance Marketplace and the Health Services and Resources Administration provides a concise summary of key points that clinicians need to know about ACA.

Families Talking Together (FTT) is an evidence based program designed to help Latino parents better communicate with their children and teens about healthy relationships, sex, contraceptive use, and preventing pregnancy.  Dr. Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, the creator of the program and co-director of the Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health at New York University’s Silver School of Social work, along with Planned Parenthood Los Angeles and Visión y Compromiso, recently enlisted 25 promotores (community health workers) from three communities in California with high rates of teen pregnancy and high percentages of Latinos in an effort to help Latino parents address teen pregnancy. Over a four-day period, the 25 promotores were trained to deliver the FTT intervention.  In the next two months, the promotores will deliver the intervention to 250 families in California.  The National Campaign wishes to recognize and thank Dr. Guilamo-Ramos, PPLA, and Visión y Compromiso for their work on this innovative and important project. 

The FTT intervention—both the community health worker curriculum and parent materials---are available online, free of charge.