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Application Deadline: 04/15/2018 at 5 pm CST

The Underserved Occupational Populations Section of ACOEM is sponsoring one $1,000 scholarship to qualified residents and medical students interested in making significant contributions to the field of underserved occupational medicine.The scholarship was established in honor of Joseph A. Fortuna, MD, FACOEM who founded the Underserved Occupational Populations Section of ACOEM and who was a tireless supporter of underserved workers and their families.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

 

Safety and Health Practices
for Nail Salon Workers

Safety and Health Practicesfor Nail Salon Workers and a Training Guide for Nail Salon Worker Safety and Health Outreach Program

 

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

 

DATE RECORDED: June 8, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

http://www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org/

ADAO is the largest independent nonprofit in the U.S. dedicated to preventing asbestos exposure, eliminating asbestos-related diseases, and protecting asbestos victims' civil rights through education, advocacy, and community initiatives. 

http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cosmetics/Pages/default.aspx

An online, searchable database that allows salon workers and others to learn about and report toxic chemicals found in nail salon products and other cosmetics.

http://umash.umn.edu/needlestick-prevention/ This webpage features factsheets and videos developed by the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) to educate farmworkers, producers, and veterinarians about needlestick prevention.  Resources are available in both English and Spanish.  

DATE RECORDED: Wednesday, June 17, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Matthew Keifer, MD, MPH, Dean Emanuel Endowed Chair/Director National Farm Medicine Center

Webinar: Pesticide poisonings. Are you prepared?
View Recorded WebinarParticipant Evaluation

EOH iconMCN’s Environmental and Occupational Health Programs

Learn more about MCN’s training and technical assistance programs to help clinicians and health centers improve the recognition and management of pesticide exposures and other environmental/occupational health conditions.

 

Mistakes can be dangerous. Accurate identification of pesticides responsible for a patient's illness is important to avoid iatrogenic errors with respect to acute treatment.  Join us for an important webinar that will focus on key decision points in the diagnosis of pesticide exposures and emphasize the usefulness of the newly revised resource for clinicians - The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed.  Through interactive case studies, this webinar will illustrate effective recognition and treatment of patients over exposed to pesticides. 


The webinar, sponsored by Migrant Clinicians Network, the National Farm Medicine Center and AgriSafe Network features Dr. Keifer, a board certified occupational medicine specialist and internationally renowned researcher regarding pesticides and agricultural health and safety. For over 30 years, Dr. Keifer has focused his clinical practice and research largely on farmworkers. 

SPONSORED BY: AgriSafe Network, Migrant Clinicians Network, and the National Farm Medicine Center

OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to:

  1. Better recognize the signs and symptoms of pesticide overexposure
  2. Identify key decision points in diagnosing pesticide exposures
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to use The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed. in a clinical setting

We encourage all participants to order The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed. prior to attending this webinar. Order here. PDF versions are also available at http://www2.epa.gov/pesticide-worker-safety/recognition-and-management-pesticide-poisonings
If you have experienced any trouble ordering your copy please contact: kbrennan@migrantclinician.org 

 

 


CLINICAL TOOLS & RESOURCES



PATIENT EDUCATION MATERIALS



ARCHIVED WEBINARS & TRAINING RESOURCES



LOCAL PESTICIDE RESOURCES


The following will provide information regarding the pesticides used in your areas:

Limited data document the multiple and repeated pesticide absorption experienced by farmworkers in an agricultural season or their risk factors.

Laboratory studies and case reports of accidental exposure to large amounts of chemicals indicate that there are immediate and long‐term negative health consequences of exposure to agricultural chemicals. 

The goal of this study was to describe acute occupational pesticide-related illnesses among youths and to provide prevention recommendations. Survey data from 8 states and from poison control center data were analyzed.

Concern about the adverse public health and environmental effects of pesticide use is persistent. Recognizing the importance of surveillance for acute occupational pesticide-related illness, we report on surveillance for this condition across multiple states. Between 1998 and 1999, a total of 1,009 individuals with acute occupational pesticide-related illness were identified by states participating in the SENSOR-pesticides program. 

In response to limitations in state-based occupational disease surveillance, the California Department of Health Services developed a model for surveillance of acute, work-related pesticide illness. The objectives were to enhance case reporting and link case reports to preventive interventions. Risk factors for pesticide illness were prevalent. 

The California Pesticide Illness Surveillance Program (PISP) is a major resource for pesticide illness epidemiology. This work attempts to improve characterization of pesticide illness in California, evaluate case ascertainment of the PISP and identify PISP’s limitations and biases for studying the incidence and epidemiology of pesticide-related illness. 

Public health surveillance for acute pesticide intoxications is discussed. Explanation of the goals, components and functions of population-based surveillance is provided with reference to key informational sources.

Pesticide Action Network, United Farmworkers of America, and California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation analyzed California government data on agricultural poisonings and enforcement of worker safety standards. Nearly 500 pesticide poisonings were reported for California farmworkers every year. The actual number of pesticide-related illnesses is unknown, since many poisonings go unreported. 

Surveillance data show that pesticide-related illness is an important cause of acute morbidity among migrant farm workers in California. Exposures occur in various ways (e.g., residues, drift), suggesting that the use of pesticides creates a hazardous work environment for all farm workers  Improved education for health care providers should be a priority. Growers should be educated about alternative forms of pest control and incentives should be provided to encourage their use.

Describes the growth from 1987 through 1996 of the Occupational Pesticide Poisoning Surveillance Program at the Texas Department of Health. The program was initially based on a Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) model, using sentinel providers to report cases, supplementing the passive reporting by physicians that was required by law. 

The CHAMACOS study is a longitudinal birth cohort study examining chemicals and other factors in the environment and children's health. 

In 1999-2000, CHAMACOS enrolled 601 pregnant women living in the agircultural Salinas Valley.  They are following their children through age 12 to measure their exposures to pesticides and other chemicals and to determine if this exposure impacts their growth, health, and development. 

Print, cut, and distribute this handy bookmark to providers who treat migrant and seasonal farmworker patients. The bookmark includes links and a qr code to connect you to pesticide - related clinical tools and resources. In addition, we've included some useful phone numbers in case of a pesticide emergency.

You can also use the bookmark to keep handy the Health Network phone number to be sure your patients on the move remain in care.

A report prepared by researchers at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services features a wealth of information on occupational health and safety and the migrant population, from farmworkers to fast-food chain employees to restaurant cooks and servers.

News release:
http://defendingscience.org/news/labor-day-looking-back-year-us-occupational-health-and-safety

California Poison Control System developed an online game that focuses on poison prevention through the use of "look-a-like" pills and candy. There are other resources on the site. The game is available as an app on itunes and in the android marketplace. Search for 'Choose your Poison.'

The West Virginia Rural Health Research Center (WVRHRC) pursues a multi-disciplinary research effort directed to improve environmental health for rural populations. Collaborators from public health, geographic information systems, nursing, pharmacy, environmental science, health policy and other disciplines work together to conduct policy-relevant research to achieve this goal.

This web site houses a collection of information, contacts and resources to assist health practitioners in providing care to migrant farm workers. Although the primary intended audience is health care providers in Ontario, much of the information may be useful to other parties.

A preliminary total of fatal work injuries recorded in the United States. According to results from the 
Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) program conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor
 Statistics.

At Workers' Comp Hub we provide basic information for workers with job-related injuries and illnesses. We also share resources to advance pro-worker advocacy and action.

http://www.farmworkercliniciansmanual.com

This comprehensive manual was developed by the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health and the Migrant Clinicians Network for the diagnosis and treatment of occupational injuries in migrant and seasonal farmworkers. The information in the manual does focus on agricultural occupations in the Northeast.

Use the link below to access MCN's Rapid Assessment Tool to help adolescent farmworkers identify agricultural tasks they perform in agriculture and facilitate clinician understanding about the health risks associated with it.  Youth worker images are adapted and reproduced with permission from the National Children Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. Images copyrighted through Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin.

If computers and internet access are unavailable where patient care is provided, the worker assessment sheet and clinician information grid are available in PDF.

This EPA report contains the latest estimates of agricultural and nonagricultural pesticide use in the United States.