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MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: December 13, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES and Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at the​ir​ worksite ready for the day's work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. ​​It didn't take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting.​ Soon his world was spinning​ and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and resulted in at least 13 worker deaths between 2000 and 2011. ​

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: May 24, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

MCN webinar clinicians sowing seeds in kansas

DATE: February 21, 2017

SPEAKERS: Ed Zuroweste, MD

 

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Agriculture is also one of the most dangerous industries in the United States. For vulnerable populations working in agriculture, their lack of training, poor safety precautions, regulatory exclusions, lack of health insurance, language barriers, piece-rate pay, immigration status, and geographical and cultural isolation can put these workers at increased risk for occupationally related injuries and illnesses and chronic sequelae. Exposure to pesticides and other contaminants is a particular concern to agricultural workers and their families. This continuing education training will discuss health risks facing immigrant and migrant agricultural workers and their families as a result of their working conditions and environment, with a particular focus on Kansas. It will also highlight best practices and resources for the incorporation of environmental and occupational health in the practice setting, showcasing successful initiatives in primary care settings. Participants will explore the importance of and become familiar with the methods to integrate environmental and occupational health into the practice setting from the clinical perspective as well as consider these issues within the framework of social determinants of health.

 

Resources

 

This material was produced, in part, under Assistance Agreement No. X883487601 awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has not been formally reviewed by EPA. EPA does not endorse any products or commercial services mentioned in this product.

MCN Clinician Guides

MCN and Farmworker Justice offer these guides to assist clinicians in understanding farmworker health and safety regulations. OSHA’s Field Sanitation Standard; EPA's Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); EPA's  Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA); EPA’s Worker Protection Standard (WPS).

http://umash.umn.edu/needlestick-prevention/ This webpage features factsheets and videos developed by the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) to educate farmworkers, producers, and veterinarians about needlestick prevention.  Resources are available in both English and Spanish.  

Print, cut, and distribute this handy bookmark to providers who treat migrant and seasonal farmworker patients. The bookmark includes links and a qr code to connect you to pesticide - related clinical tools and resources. In addition, we've included some useful phone numbers in case of a pesticide emergency.

You can also use the bookmark to keep handy the Health Network phone number to be sure your patients on the move remain in care.

Introduction

In August of 2005, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch (OEEB) was notified that three women who had worked on farms in North Carolina owned by Ag-Mart had delivered infants with birth defects.  All three births took place in Florida where the women also worked on Ag-Mart farms and lived near each other.  This report summarizes the OEEB’s investigation and assessment of the pesticide exposures likely experienced by these women while in North Carolina. 

http://www.farmworkercliniciansmanual.com

This comprehensive manual was developed by the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health and the Migrant Clinicians Network for the diagnosis and treatment of occupational injuries in migrant and seasonal farmworkers. The information in the manual does focus on agricultural occupations in the Northeast.

These Cholinesterase (ChE) clinical tools provide a concise and simple format to guide clinicians in monitoring the ChE levels for patients working with Class I and Class II organophosphates (OP) or OP and N-methyl-carbamates. 

This booklet is intended to help Community Health Centers put in place an effective and efficient workers' compensation program.

MCN's Pesticide Clinical Guidelines and Pesticide Exposure Assessment Form assist in the recognition and management of acute pesticide exposures in primary care settings.

The pesticide guidelines were adapted from guidelines developed by Dr. Dennis H. Penzell, a former medical director of a Community and Migrant Health Center with experience in large-scale pesticide exposure incidents.

The Acute Pesticide Exposure Form was adapted from the data collection on an acute pesticide exposed patient tool developed by Matthew C. Keifer, MD, MPH, Director of the National Farm Medicine Center, appearing in the EPA's Recognition and Management of Pesticide Exposures, 6th Edition, EPA 2013.

These resources were developed with guidance from MCN's Environmental and Occupational Health Advisory Committee - a panel of healthcare professionals and researchers with expertise in pesticides and migrant health.

The following documents are a collection of the best resources available for taking a good occupational health history.

Bilingual form to screen pregnant women for lead exposure.  Developed by MCN.

 

Clinicial guidelines dealing with children and lead exposure.  Special emphasis on working with migrant children. 

Use the link below to access MCN's Rapid Assessment Tool to help adolescent farmworkers identify agricultural tasks they perform in agriculture and facilitate clinician understanding about the health risks associated with it.  Youth worker images are adapted and reproduced with permission from the National Children Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. Images copyrighted through Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin.

If computers and internet access are unavailable where patient care is provided, the worker assessment sheet and clinician information grid are available in PDF.

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g924790533

The Journal of Agromedicine published this FREE special issue (Volume 15, Issue 3) that presents papers based upon the research and safety strategies presented at the "Be Safe, Be Profitable: Protecting Workers in Agriculture" conference held in January 2010 in Dallas, Texas. The conference was a joint meeting of the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASCHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). "It is our hope that this collection of editorials, panel presentations, plenary talks, and poster abstracts stimulates a new order of translational research, leading to effective research partnerships and improved health and safety outcomes," states Editor-in-Chief Steven Kirkhorn.

Do not miss the opportunity to read the results from this groundbreaking agricultural safety and health conference!

California Department of Public Health, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control has identified several cases of mercury toxicity linked to the use of adulterated, unlabelled face creams in the Latino community.  

http://www.neefusa.org/health/asthma/asthmaguidelines.htm

These guidelines are aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. Offers clinical competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma and outlines the environmental interventions to communicate to patients.

Continuing education course developed by the Occupational Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, California Department of Public Health.  Can view it for information or can register for credits.

The Toolkit is a combination of easy-to-use reference guides for health providers and user friendly health education materials on preventing exposures to toxic chemicals and other substances that affect infant and child health.

A useful resource for health professionals interested in the health effects of exposure to specific chemicals and hazardous substances.

Objective, science-based information about pesticides - written for the non-expert.