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Anger amidst care resource

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A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

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How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

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Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

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Healthy Sleep Tips

Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

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2021 Heat Related illness Clinicians Guide

Agricultural workers are at significant risk for heat stress. Heat stress results when the body cannot get rid of excess heat and its core temperature rises.  Heat stress may lead to more severe heat illness including heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat stroke, and even death if left untreated.  Agricultural work, which requires performing physically demanding work for long hours in hot and sometimes humid weather, places workers at high risk.

This guide provides information to clinicians on the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness. Since workers may not be familiar with all of the symptoms of heat stress, it is important that clinicians discuss heat illness symptoms and prevention with agricultural workers and others who are at risk.

 


This joint FJ and MCN publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of awards totaling $1,949,598 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HHS.gov.

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: December 13, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES and Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at the​ir​ worksite ready for the day's work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. ​​It didn't take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting.​ Soon his world was spinning​ and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and resulted in at least 13 worker deaths between 2000 and 2011. ​

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

This page highlights important tools for clinicians as well as diagnoses to consider when caring for disaster-affected patients.

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: May 24, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


MCN webinar what to do when diabetes affects your mood

DATE: May 10, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Patria Alguila and Ileana Ponce-Gonzalez, MD, MPH, CNC

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​In this webinar participants will be able to identify the Health Resource Services Administration performance measures related to depression, describe symptoms of depression, understand how to encourage patients to control and manage their diabetes and depression​, and understand the principle barriers faced by patients in the control and management of their diabetes and depression

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the term mental illness
  2. List at least two symptoms of depression
  3. Define the HRSA quality measure for depression screening
  4. Understand at least one barrier in the control of diabetes and depression

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

"Emerging Infectious Diseases is an open access journal published monthly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)." ... "Emerging Infectious Diseases follows the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommendations for the conduct, reporting, editing, and publishing of scholarly work in medical journals. The journal’s peer review process allows for critical assessment of submitted manuscripts by experts who are usually not part of its editorial staff. As an independent publication, the journal’s peer-review process operates independently from CDC’s clearance processes."

MCN webinar clinicians sowing seeds in kansas

DATE: February 21, 2017

SPEAKERS: Ed Zuroweste, MD

 

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Agriculture is also one of the most dangerous industries in the United States. For vulnerable populations working in agriculture, their lack of training, poor safety precautions, regulatory exclusions, lack of health insurance, language barriers, piece-rate pay, immigration status, and geographical and cultural isolation can put these workers at increased risk for occupationally related injuries and illnesses and chronic sequelae. Exposure to pesticides and other contaminants is a particular concern to agricultural workers and their families. This continuing education training will discuss health risks facing immigrant and migrant agricultural workers and their families as a result of their working conditions and environment, with a particular focus on Kansas. It will also highlight best practices and resources for the incorporation of environmental and occupational health in the practice setting, showcasing successful initiatives in primary care settings. Participants will explore the importance of and become familiar with the methods to integrate environmental and occupational health into the practice setting from the clinical perspective as well as consider these issues within the framework of social determinants of health.

 

Resources

 

This material was produced, in part, under Assistance Agreement No. X883487601 awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has not been formally reviewed by EPA. EPA does not endorse any products or commercial services mentioned in this product.

 

Substance Use Warmline
Peer-to-Peer Consultation and Decision Support
10 am – 6 pm EST Monday - Friday
855-300-3595

Free and confidential consultation for clinicians from the Clinician Consultation Center at San Francisco General Hospital focusing on substance use in primary care

 

Objectives of the Substance Use Warmline:

  • Support primary care providers in managing complex patients with addiction, chronic pain, and behavioral health issues
  • Improve the safety of medication regimens to decrease the risk of overdose
  • Enhance the treatment, care and support for people living with or at risk for HIV
  • Discuss useful strategies for clinicians in managing their patients living with substance use, addiction and chronic pain.

Consultation topics include:

  • Assessment and treatment of opioid, alcohol, and other substance use disorders
  • Approaches to suspected misuse, abuse, or diversion of prescribed opioids
  • Methods to simplify opioid-based pain regimens to reduce risk of misuse and toxicity
  • Urine toxicology testing- when to use it and what it means
  • Use of buprenorphine and the role of methadone maintenance
  • Withdrawal management for opioids, alcohol, and other CNS depressants
  • Harm reduction strategies and overdose prevention
  • Managing substance use in special populations (pregnancy, HIV, hepatitis)
  • Productive ways of discussing (known or suspected) addiction with patients.

The CCC’s multi-disciplinary team of expert physicians, clinical pharmacists and nurses provides consultation to help clinicians manage complex patient needs, medication safety, and a rapidly evolving regulatory environment.

Learn more at http://nccc.ucsf.edu/clinician-consultation/substance-use-management

This 90-minute webinar was created for physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who treat and case manage patients with active TB.  The webinar introduced the 2016 Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.  This training highlighted the guidelines development process, the key changes in recommendations, and discussed the evidence supporting the changes.  The webinar was originally presented on November 4, 2016. This training was jointly sponsored by all 5 RTMCCs.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

  • Recorded Webinar
  • Participant Evaluation
  • Presentation Slides (PDF)

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading
  • Coming soon

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

A CDC resource page where there is current Zika updates and resources.

MCN Clinician Guides

MCN and Farmworker Justice offer these guides to assist clinicians in understanding farmworker health and safety regulations. OSHA’s Field Sanitation Standard; EPA's Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); EPA's  Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA); EPA’s Worker Protection Standard (WPS).

The National LGBT Health Education Center provides educational programs, resources, and consultation to health care organizations with the goal of optimizing quality, cost-effective health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

http://umash.umn.edu/needlestick-prevention/ This webpage features factsheets and videos developed by the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) to educate farmworkers, producers, and veterinarians about needlestick prevention.  Resources are available in both English and Spanish.  

Part 6 of the 6 webinar series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

DATE RECORDED: June 25, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Brett Pack, DMD, Dental Director, Moses Lake Community Health Center and Maria Smith, MPA, Project Director, National Network for Oral Health Access

View Recorded Webinar  

Participant Evaluation  

Presentation Slides (PDF)

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing any of these webinars you must do the following:
  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with each webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

Note: Only participants of the live webinar are eligible for continuing dental education units.

The Patient-Centered Health Home is a concept being implemented through a variety of approaches including full integration, co-location, shared financing, virtual linkages and facilitated referral and follow-up. Health Homes are an important approach for helping to ensure that health center populations have access to comprehensive health care services, including dental care. This presentation will describe how oral health can be integrated into overall primary care systems to improve health care quality and outcomes of the patients we serve, by illustrating promising practices from an example health center oral health program.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand why medical-dental integration is a positive attribute
  2. Describe examples of medical-dental integration at the clinical level
  3. Receive “take home” examples of how to incorporate oral health into your health center’s Patient-Centered Health Home.

 

FURTHER READING

Visit www.nnoha.org to access resources available to support safety net oral health programs and to join as a member.

Report mentioned during the webinar: Oral Health and the Patient Centered Health Home: Action Guide 
http://www.nnoha.org/resources/clinical-excellence/integrate-care/

Part 5 of the 6 webinar series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

DATE RECORDED: June 5, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Katherine Brieger, RD and Elizabeth Magenheimer

View Recorded Webinar

Participant Evaluation  

Presentation Slides (PDF)

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing any of these webinars you must do the following:
  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with each webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

Diabetes continues to be one of the most common and challenging health condition confronting migrants and other underserved populations. It is clear that a healthy lifestyle is critical to mitigating the impact of diabetes on individuals and the population, however effective and appropriate interventions can be difficult to design. Fairhaven Community Health Center in Connecticut and Hudson River Healthcare in New York, are two health centers that have long led the way in creating culturally appropriate lifestyle programs for migrants and other underserved patients. In this session the presenters will discuss lessons learned from the development of a variety of programs for diabetics and other patients including a community garden, nutrition classes, cooking classes, weight management and strategies to encourage exercise. The session will address the clinical core measures related to nutrition and BMI and will also discuss current research test second line drug effectiveness in Type 2 DM. Available in English

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe culturally appropriate diabetes intervention strategies
  2. Identify strategies to address clinical core competencies related to nutrition and BMI to improve quality care.
  3. Receive “take home” examples of how to incorporate effective nutrition, weight loss, exercise and other health lifestyle strategies.

 

FURTHER READING

Download the Spanish Toolkit Materials

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/preventionprogram

Bright Bodies, http://brightbodies.org

These files are part of the Engaging Migrant Men project.

MCN developed 3 vignettes that portray the three messages developed in video and printed form.

These files are part of the Engaging Migrant Men project.

Accompanying discussion guides were created to be used by male peers, community leaders, or outreach workers for one-on-one and small group discussions with men.

Hombres Unidos is a peer-led workshop focused on the primary prevention of sexual and intimate partner violence (s/ipv) with Latino migrant men.  Developed in 2005 with the support from the Centers for Disease and Control, this five session workshop is implemented using a popular education technique (Paulo Freire) which is a concept that incorporates notions of class, political struggle and social transformation.  

This webinar (sponsored by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs) focuses on the collaborative development of a primary prevention workshop for Latino migrant men, the evaluation of the workshop, and the continuing effort on engaging Latino migrant men as allies with women in s/ipv prevention after the five session workshop.

After this webinar, participants will be able to identify:

  • methods on how to begin a conversation on sexual and intimate partner violence with Latino migrant men
  • process and outcome evaluation techniques on a primary prevention workshop developed for a specific population
  • efforts to continue to engage Latino migrant men in sexual and intimate partner violence prevention
  • how to incorporate existing efforts with your population

Recording & Materials

During the webinar, Adrian referenced a few handouts that are used in the program.  Below you will find a few of these in Spanish.

Print, cut, and distribute this handy bookmark to providers who treat migrant and seasonal farmworker patients. The bookmark includes links and a qr code to connect you to pesticide - related clinical tools and resources. In addition, we've included some useful phone numbers in case of a pesticide emergency.

You can also use the bookmark to keep handy the Health Network phone number to be sure your patients on the move remain in care.

This webinar is the sixth in a series of seven in our Clinician Orienatation to Migration Health.

DATE RECORDED: Wednesday, July 17, 2013
PRESENTED BY: Candace Kugel, FNP, CNM, Specialist in Clinical Systems & Women's Health and Melissa Bailey, Executive Director of North Carolina Field, Inc.

To view the recorded version of this webinar, click here.