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Steps For an Organization to Consider When Addressing Conflict

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How to De-escalate a Tense Interaction

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Anger amidst care resource

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A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

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How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

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Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

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Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

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Healthy Sleep Tips

Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

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Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

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2021 Heat Related illness Clinicians Guide

Agricultural workers are at significant risk for heat stress. Heat stress results when the body cannot get rid of excess heat and its core temperature rises.  Heat stress may lead to more severe heat illness including heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat stroke, and even death if left untreated.  Agricultural work, which requires performing physically demanding work for long hours in hot and sometimes humid weather, places workers at high risk.

This guide provides information to clinicians on the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness. Since workers may not be familiar with all of the symptoms of heat stress, it is important that clinicians discuss heat illness symptoms and prevention with agricultural workers and others who are at risk.

 


This joint FJ and MCN publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of awards totaling $1,949,598 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HHS.gov.

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: December 13, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES and Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at the​ir​ worksite ready for the day's work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. ​​It didn't take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting.​ Soon his world was spinning​ and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and resulted in at least 13 worker deaths between 2000 and 2011. ​

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

"Coccidioidomycosis or Valley Fever is an infectious disease in parts of the U.S.A. It is caused by inhaling microscopic arthroconidia (also known as arthrospores or spores) of the closely related fungal species Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. Areas where Coccidioides is endemic (native and common) include states in the southwestern U.S.A. such as Arizona, California, New Mexico, Nevada, Texas, and Utah and parts of Mexico, Central America and South America."

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: May 24, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


MCN webinar what to do when diabetes affects your mood

DATE: May 10, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Patria Alguila and Ileana Ponce-Gonzalez, MD, MPH, CNC

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​In this webinar participants will be able to identify the Health Resource Services Administration performance measures related to depression, describe symptoms of depression, understand how to encourage patients to control and manage their diabetes and depression​, and understand the principle barriers faced by patients in the control and management of their diabetes and depression

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the term mental illness
  2. List at least two symptoms of depression
  3. Define the HRSA quality measure for depression screening
  4. Understand at least one barrier in the control of diabetes and depression

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

"Emerging Infectious Diseases is an open access journal published monthly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)." ... "Emerging Infectious Diseases follows the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommendations for the conduct, reporting, editing, and publishing of scholarly work in medical journals. The journal’s peer review process allows for critical assessment of submitted manuscripts by experts who are usually not part of its editorial staff. As an independent publication, the journal’s peer-review process operates independently from CDC’s clearance processes."

Tomato Workers Health Guide

 

Available in English and Spanish!

 

Created by MCN, medical student Rachel Kelley of UCSF, and collaborators at East Tennessee State University, this guide is intended to be a reference for health care providers who work with people employed in the U.S. tomato industry. It aims to prepare providers with a more detailed understanding of hazards, health issues, and work processes associated with different tomato industry jobs.

This guide draws on published research, experienced health professionals’ advice, and information gathered from interviews and focus groups conducted with 36 tomato workers from diverse backgrounds and 14 community leaders familiar with tomato workers’ health in multiple states. It is important to note that health and safety conditions at any particular farm or company may vary from what is described here. Furthermore, individual workers may experience the same set of conditions differently.

The first section of the guide focuses on health hazards and health conditions commonly encountered in tomato production. The second section consists of detailed descriptions and illustrations of different tomato production tasks. The third section covers “human resources” information and policies that apply to U.S. agricultural workers generally. The appendices contain a Spanish-English glossary, further detail about different types of pesticides, information about agricultural occupational health policies and regulation, and a list of resources and readings.

 

Substance Use Warmline
Peer-to-Peer Consultation and Decision Support
10 am – 6 pm EST Monday - Friday
855-300-3595

Free and confidential consultation for clinicians from the Clinician Consultation Center at San Francisco General Hospital focusing on substance use in primary care

 

Objectives of the Substance Use Warmline:

  • Support primary care providers in managing complex patients with addiction, chronic pain, and behavioral health issues
  • Improve the safety of medication regimens to decrease the risk of overdose
  • Enhance the treatment, care and support for people living with or at risk for HIV
  • Discuss useful strategies for clinicians in managing their patients living with substance use, addiction and chronic pain.

Consultation topics include:

  • Assessment and treatment of opioid, alcohol, and other substance use disorders
  • Approaches to suspected misuse, abuse, or diversion of prescribed opioids
  • Methods to simplify opioid-based pain regimens to reduce risk of misuse and toxicity
  • Urine toxicology testing- when to use it and what it means
  • Use of buprenorphine and the role of methadone maintenance
  • Withdrawal management for opioids, alcohol, and other CNS depressants
  • Harm reduction strategies and overdose prevention
  • Managing substance use in special populations (pregnancy, HIV, hepatitis)
  • Productive ways of discussing (known or suspected) addiction with patients.

The CCC’s multi-disciplinary team of expert physicians, clinical pharmacists and nurses provides consultation to help clinicians manage complex patient needs, medication safety, and a rapidly evolving regulatory environment.

Learn more at http://nccc.ucsf.edu/clinician-consultation/substance-use-management

This 90-minute webinar was created for physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who treat and case manage patients with active TB.  The webinar introduced the 2016 Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.  This training highlighted the guidelines development process, the key changes in recommendations, and discussed the evidence supporting the changes.  The webinar was originally presented on November 4, 2016. This training was jointly sponsored by all 5 RTMCCs.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

  • Recorded Webinar
  • Participant Evaluation
  • Presentation Slides (PDF)

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading
  • Coming soon

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: August 17, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Amy Liebman, MPA, MA and Wilson Augustave, member of MCN’s Board of Directors and Senior HIV Case Manager at Finger Lakes Community Health

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Milton “Tito” Rafael Barreto Hernandez was 22 years old when he died. He was killed when he was pulled into a machine at the concrete crushing facility where he worked.  This work-related death could have been prevented and would likely never have happened had the right safety procedures been followed.  Low-wage workers like Tito often work in dangerous jobs and immigrants are more likely to die or get hurt at work.  In spite of dangers on the job, all workers have the right to a safe and healthy workplace. This training for community health workers will equip you with the knowledge you need to empower people to advocate for their rights on the job. Additionally, participants will come to understand how to seek help in case of a dangerous work environment and to be familiar with resources to assist workers.   

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
    Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
    Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
    Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
  2. Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
  3. Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

A CDC resource page where there is current Zika updates and resources.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Ver en Español

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 15, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Dra. Maura Patricia García Castillo, MD, MPH

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CNE or CHW (for Texas) credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

This webinar will provide an in-depth look at social determinants of health, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the interactions between the two.  Social determinants, including economic stability, access to education, access to healthy natural environments, and socioeconomic conditions like high levels of poverty in the community, are associated with early-onset cardiovascular disease. The webinar will also address the most common cardiovascular conditions among underserved populations.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the social determinants of health
  2. Recognize cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors
  3. Understand how the social determinants of health influence cardiovascular disease risk factors
  4. Learn strategies for prevention and intervention to limit the impact of these social determinants
Further Reading

Ver en Español

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: May 25, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Antonio Tovar, PhD

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

The National LGBT Health Education Center provides educational programs, resources, and consultation to health care organizations with the goal of optimizing quality, cost-effective health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

Video interview with COPE Executive Director Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD.

About COPE: The University of Washington’s COPE for Chronic Pain CME Program offers evidence-based clinical knowledge and training on how best to treat patients experiencing chronic pain. COPE CME helps clinicians assess patients and monitor their progress, mitigate risk, and focus on restoring function and quality of life. It provides guidance on when and how to start, stop, or modify opioid therapies. COPE’s online course includes case-based video vignettes that model interactions between providers and patients, helping to improve communications that promote trust. Live and web-based CME is available.

 

Only 25% of physicians feel very confident in managing patients on opioids. 

When many of today's physicians were in medical school, they learned that opioids were safe, and no dose seemed too high. Now, evidence-based practice paints a far more nuanced picture. More than 200 million prescriptions a year have contributed to widespread problems:

  • 33% of young adults say that prescription opioids are "easy to get," with many taking their friends' or parents' pills.
  • Nearly 20% of U.S. veterans with PTSD are receiving higher-dose or multiple opioids, or early refills.
  • Increased prescribing to women of childbearing age has contributed to a 4-fold increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome

COPE offers free CME on safe opioid prescribing:

  • COPE-REMS: an online, self-paced tutorial that awards up to 4 CME credits
  • UW TelePain: Providers can call in to UW Medicine and present their most difficult chronic pain cases to a multidisciplinary panel of pain medicine experts for discussion and advice. Tune in to live, lunchtime, 1-hour sessions most Wednesdays at 12 PM to earn up to 1.5 CME credits per session.

Other resources from COPE include:

DATE RECORDED: Friday, July 11
PRESENTED BY: Ed Zuroweste, MD. Chief Medical Officer, Migrant Clinicians Network

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MCN’s Environmental and Occupational Health Programs

Learn more about MCN’s training and technical assistance programs to help clinicians and health centers improve the recognition and management of pesticide exposures and other environmental/occupational health conditions.

Migrant workers are often employed in some of the most dangerous jobs in the United States. Lack of training, poor safety precautions, regulatory exclusions, lack of health insurance, language barriers, piece-rate pay, undocumented worker status, and geographical and cultural isolation can put these workers at increased risk for occupationally related injuries and illnesses and chronic sequelae.  

This webinar will discuss health risks facing migrants as a result of their working conditions and highlight best practices and resources to incorporate environmental and work-related health into the primary care setting.  It will aslo showcase successful initiatives employed in Community and Migrant Health Centers.  Participants will become familiar with the importance of and feasible approaches to integrate environmental and occupational health into primary care from both a clinical and social justice perspective.

 

SPONSORED BY: Migrant Clinicians Network

OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the reasons for integratin environmental and occupational health into primary care
  2. Recognize the role of the clinician in work-related exposure
  3. Be familiar with tools and resources to address occupational injuries and exposures in primary care

 


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