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How to De-escalate a Tense Interaction

Haitian CreoleLeer en espanol button  

Images of the featured resources

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A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

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How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

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Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

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Healthy Sleep Tips

Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

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Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

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English brochure preview

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Title page of comic book

Diabetes is a common but complicated health condition facing agricultural workers within the United States. To help assist agricultural workers in learning about this diagnosis, Migrant Clinicians Network has partnered with professional artist and collaborator Salvador Sáenz to create “Mi salud es mi tesoro: Un guía para vivir bien con diabetes,” or, “My Health is My Treasure: A Guide to Living Well with Diabetes.” This low-literacy comic book explores the topic through the full-color story of an agricultural farmworker named Goyo, whose recent diagnosis of diabetes prompts him to engage in conversations with other agricultural workers on topics of diet, exercise, and illness prevention while facing the unique hurdles of living a life of migration. The comic book was originally produced in Spanish, and is now available in English below. Please click "Leer en español" above to access the Spanish-language version. 

 

Download a digital copy of the comic book below!

This resource offers training for community based organizations and workers in the aftermath of natural disasters. It includes educational materials as well as trainer guides and tools.

Blog post from the U.S. Department of Labor highlighting common hazards during hurricane cleanup as well as links to additional readings.

Information on keeping food and water safe for consumption and best hygiene practices in the face of disasters.

Offers tips about potential hazards and protective strategies during disaster cleanup.

Tomato Workers Health Guide

 

Available in English and Spanish!

 

Created by MCN, medical student Rachel Kelley of UCSF, and collaborators at East Tennessee State University, this guide is intended to be a reference for health care providers who work with people employed in the U.S. tomato industry. It aims to prepare providers with a more detailed understanding of hazards, health issues, and work processes associated with different tomato industry jobs.

This guide draws on published research, experienced health professionals’ advice, and information gathered from interviews and focus groups conducted with 36 tomato workers from diverse backgrounds and 14 community leaders familiar with tomato workers’ health in multiple states. It is important to note that health and safety conditions at any particular farm or company may vary from what is described here. Furthermore, individual workers may experience the same set of conditions differently.

The first section of the guide focuses on health hazards and health conditions commonly encountered in tomato production. The second section consists of detailed descriptions and illustrations of different tomato production tasks. The third section covers “human resources” information and policies that apply to U.S. agricultural workers generally. The appendices contain a Spanish-English glossary, further detail about different types of pesticides, information about agricultural occupational health policies and regulation, and a list of resources and readings.

A kit from the CDC designed to help reduce the risk of infection by the Zika virus. "If you live in a state or area with the mosquito that spreads the Zika virus and are concerned about Zika, build your own Zika Prevention Kit (...). Reducing the risk for Zika is particularly important for pregnant women."

Information from the CDC on the Zika Virus and pregnant women.

Zika educatinal materials from the Texas Department of State Health Services which includes fact sheets, push cards, posters, and TV PSAs. Available in both English and Spanish.

A flier created by the CDC's National Diabetes Education Program as a guide for patients in the management of medicines to treat diabetes. Available in English.

Diabetes HealthSense provides easy access to resources to help you live well and meet your goals—whether you have diabetes or are at risk for the disease. Available in English.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

  • Recorded Webinar
  • Participant Evaluation
  • Presentation Slides (PDF)

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading
  • Coming soon

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: August 17, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Amy Liebman, MPA, MA and Wilson Augustave, member of MCN’s Board of Directors and Senior HIV Case Manager at Finger Lakes Community Health

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Milton “Tito” Rafael Barreto Hernandez was 22 years old when he died. He was killed when he was pulled into a machine at the concrete crushing facility where he worked.  This work-related death could have been prevented and would likely never have happened had the right safety procedures been followed.  Low-wage workers like Tito often work in dangerous jobs and immigrants are more likely to die or get hurt at work.  In spite of dangers on the job, all workers have the right to a safe and healthy workplace. This training for community health workers will equip you with the knowledge you need to empower people to advocate for their rights on the job. Additionally, participants will come to understand how to seek help in case of a dangerous work environment and to be familiar with resources to assist workers.   

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
    Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
    Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
    Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
  2. Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
  3. Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

A CDC resource page where there is current Zika updates and resources.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

These bilingual posters educate workers on how to work safely with machinery on the farm.  Developed by two Occupational Health Interns (OHIP) during their internship with the National Farm Medicine Center, these posters accompany the Seguridad en las Lecherías curriculum.

MCN's Bilingual Picture Dictionary, "Seguridad en Palabras/ Safety in Words," illustrates work place hazards and best practices for health and safety in agriculture.  Developed with support from the OSHA Susan Harwood Grant Program, this resource will bolster Hispanic workers' English vocabulary and will help prevent agricultural injuries. 

Part 5 of the 6 webinar series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

DATE RECORDED: June 5, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Katherine Brieger, RD and Elizabeth Magenheimer

View Recorded Webinar

Participant Evaluation  

Presentation Slides (PDF)

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing any of these webinars you must do the following:
  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with each webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

Diabetes continues to be one of the most common and challenging health condition confronting migrants and other underserved populations. It is clear that a healthy lifestyle is critical to mitigating the impact of diabetes on individuals and the population, however effective and appropriate interventions can be difficult to design. Fairhaven Community Health Center in Connecticut and Hudson River Healthcare in New York, are two health centers that have long led the way in creating culturally appropriate lifestyle programs for migrants and other underserved patients. In this session the presenters will discuss lessons learned from the development of a variety of programs for diabetics and other patients including a community garden, nutrition classes, cooking classes, weight management and strategies to encourage exercise. The session will address the clinical core measures related to nutrition and BMI and will also discuss current research test second line drug effectiveness in Type 2 DM. Available in English

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe culturally appropriate diabetes intervention strategies
  2. Identify strategies to address clinical core competencies related to nutrition and BMI to improve quality care.
  3. Receive “take home” examples of how to incorporate effective nutrition, weight loss, exercise and other health lifestyle strategies.

 

FURTHER READING

Download the Spanish Toolkit Materials

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/preventionprogram

Bright Bodies, http://brightbodies.org

New bilingual resource available April 2014!

Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) has been using theater as an educational tool with farmworkers for over twenty years. By drawing on techniques of popular theater, SAF performs culturally appropriate, lively skits and facilitates theater workshops at farm labor camps. These performances spur conversations about mental and physical health, living and working conditions, and farmworker movements for social justice.

Many of SAF’s performances have focused on health issues, and they aim for this guide to offer dynamic tools for health care providers, educators, outreach workers, and public health innovators. Practitioners can also use these techniques with other populations across the social justice spectrum. For both organizers and educators, SAF hopes that popular theater can bolster the messages and information that you so readily share and provide a dynamic approach to outreach. Resources include songs, scripts, theater games and icebreakers. Printed copies are free, but SAF accepts small contributions to cover shipping and handling ($5-10/copy).

 

Available in print and online

Contact: Laxmi Haynes , 919-660-3660

These files are part of the Engaging Migrant Men project.

MCN developed 3 vignettes that portray the three messages developed in video and printed form.